09 Mar

The Importance of HTTPS

Very few internet users understand the meaning of the padlock icon in their web browser’s address bar. It represents HTTPS, a security feature that authenticates websites and protects the information users submit to them. Let’s go over some user-friendly HTTPS best practices to help you surf the web safely.


HTTPS Encryption


Older web protocols lack data encryption. When you visit a website that doesn’t use HTTPS, everything you type or click on that website is sent across the network in plain text. So, if your bank’s website doesn’t use the latest protocols, your login information can be intercepted by anyone with the right tools.


HTTPS Certificates


The second thing outdated web browsing lacks is publisher certificates. When you enter a web address into your browser, your computer uses an online directory to translate that text into numerical addresses (e.g., www.google.com = then saves that information on your computer so it doesn’t need to check the online directory every time you visit a known website.

The problem is, if your computer is hacked it could be tricked into directing www.google.com to, even if that’s a malicious website. Oftentimes, this strategy is implemented to send users to sites that look exactly like what they expected, but are actually false-front sites designed to trick you into providing your credentials.

HTTPS created a new ecosystem of certificates that are issued by the online directories mentioned earlier. These certificates make it impossible for you to be redirected to a false-front website.


What this means for daily browsing


Most people hop from site to site too quickly to check each one for padlocks and certificates. Unfortunately, HTTPS is way too important to ignore. Here are a few things to consider when browsing:

If your browser marks a website as “unsafe” do not click “proceed anyway” unless you are absolutely certain nothing private will be transmitted.
There are web browser extensions that create encrypted connections to unencrypted websites (HTTPS Everywhere is great for Chrome and Firefox).
HTTPS certificates don’t mean anything if you don’t recognize the company’s name. For example, goog1e.com (with the ‘l’ replaced with a one) could have a certificate, but that doesn’t mean it’s a trustworthy site.


Avoiding sites that don’t use the HTTPS protocol is just one of many things you need to do to stay safe when browsing the internet. When you’re ready for IT support that handles the finer points of cybersecurity like safe web browsing, give our office a call. You can reach us at 1-866-BIT-WISE or sales@eitnetworks.net

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16 Sep

The Cool Chrome Function you Aren’t Using

Everything is wirelessly connected nowadays. If you can purchase a refrigerator that sends you a message when your vegetables are going bad, why can’t you stream the audio and video of your phone or desktop to your TV? It turns out you can, and Google just made it a whole lot easier. Let’s take a closer look at how Google Chrome is working to connect all your audio/visual hardware together with Chromecast.


In its earliest stages, ‘Casting’ allowed users to stream a device’s screen to a TV with a Chromecast wireless adapter plugged into the HDMI port. Soon after, Google released a second, updated model that added the possibility of connecting to audio-only devices via stereo cable and faster internal hardware to improve streaming to both TVs and stereo systems.


Regardless of which model you had previous to last month’s update, individual apps needed to include Casting functionality, and even Google’s own Chrome browser required downloading and installing an extension before users could get the most out of the service. As an industry leader in user experience and design, the engineers at Google knew this had to be fixed. Their solution was a no-brainer, and may even be sitting in your browser this very moment.


The Cast feature is now built directly into every updated version of the Chrome. Just click the three stacked lines that act as Chrome’s File menu and select Cast halfway down the menu. Click the arrow to the right of ‘Cast to’ and choose desktop, followed by which Chromecast device you would like to broadcast, and voilà — your computer’s desktop will be duplicated on your Chromecast-enabled TV.


Assuming you’re currently connected to a trusted wireless network, we invite you to give it a try right here and now. If you’re confused about why we would suggest such a thing when you haven’t had a chance to go out and buy the necessary hardware adapter, that’s because several big-name TV brands are now installing this functionality directly into their televisions. You may have had this feature all along without even knowing it!


Once you’ve mastered casting your screens and audio wirelessly, why not check out all the apps Google has highlighted specifically for this Chrome feature? From NFL streaming to slideshow production, the Play Store has everything you’re looking for to step up your casting game.


It’s amazing how something so useful and so accessible could go relatively unnoticed for so long. There are tons of wonderful and exciting features lurking around, even in software as ordinary as your internet browser. For IT solutions big and small, there’s only one number you need to know — and it’s right at the bottom of this page. Give us a call today at 1-866-BIT-WISE, or email sales@eitnetworks.net.

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12 Feb

How to Make Chrome Fast Again

For Internet users who are accustomed to a speedy connection, there’s nothing worse than a sluggish web browser. It impacts your workflow, slows down your productivity, and causes frustration. But luckily there are some methods you can use to improve your web browser’s speed and performance. If you’re a Google Chrome user, check out these simple troubleshooting tips to make your browser faster.


Disable extensions


Extensions are basically small programs that you can download from the Chrome Web Store to add more features and functionality to your Chrome. While certain extensions are very useful (like AdBlock and Evernote) if you have too many installed, Chrome’s speed may suffer from processing all of these extensions at once.

Most extensions will show on Chrome’s address bar, and you can quickly uninstall them by right-clicking on the button and selecting “Uninstall”. You can also navigate to the hamburger icon on the toolbar, select “More tools” and then “Extensions”. From there you’ll find a list of extensions that may have been inadvertently installed by a user. Simply uncheck the “Enabled” box for the ones you don’t need.


Disable plugins


When you first install Google Chrome, some unnecessary plugins are also installed and enabled by default. Over the course of your web browsing session, you may even add more plugins to Chrome without knowing. As with extensions, you can disable plugins that are not in use. Simply type chrome:plugins into the address bar and press Enter. Note that plugins can only be disabled, not uninstalled. We recommend you keep the Adobe Flash Player plugin enabled, since many websites today use Flash to display menus and videos.


Clear browsing data


Chrome has a cache database that collects URLs of the websites you’ve visited, your download history, and cookies. While the purpose of this feature is to speed up your computer by caching data instead of loading it again every time, sometimes the browsing history can get bloated with hundreds and thousands of websites you’ve previously visited. Luckily there’s a quick fix: enter chrome://history in the address bar and hit Enter. Select “Clear browsing data” and select the items you wish to delete and choose a time range from the drop-down list. Click “Clear browsing data” again to remove the selected data.


Use the Clean up Tool


In some cases the speed of your Chrome may be affected by the software installed on your computer. Google has released its very own application that will scan and remove any software that may conflict with Chrome. You can check out the Chrome Cleanup Tool here. All you need to do is download and run the application, and sit back while the program scans your PC. The app is very helpful if you’ve tried the above tips but your Chrome continues to be sluggish.


Web browsers are indispensable tools for your business. You and your employees use them everyday to check emails, research information, get work done, manage social media accounts, and more. If the browser you’re using is not performing up to your expectations, contact us today and we’ll get to the root of the problem and fix it. You can reach us at 1-866-BIT-WISE or sales@eitnetworks.net.

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09 Oct

Best Browser Extensions for Security

Protecting your privacy online is crucial in today’s world to avoid data breaches, malware attacks, and other mischief hackers can throw your way. The easiest way to do this is through browser extensions, but the question is which is best? Here, we’ll take a look at the most popular browser extensions that promise to protect your online privacy.


AdBlock Plus (Chrome/Firefox/Safari)


AdBlock Plus blocks ads, scripts, and popups on your browser. It kills third-party scripts and widgets that send your data to who-knows-where. Be careful you use it properly, the extension can break the sites you read, which is why you have to first figure out what to allow and what to block. AdBlock Plus also stops you from visiting known malware-hosting domains, and it allows power users to play with different subscription lists while basic users can just enable it and walk away. Best of all, it is completely free.


Disconnect (Chrome/Firefox/Safari)


Disconnect Private Browsing protects you from tracking, malware, and malvertising while offering secure Wi-Fi and bandwidth optimization features. Third party tracking cookies become a thing of the past, and you can enjoy total control over all site scripts and elements from a user-friendly toolbar menu. You’re completely guarded from ads injected by malware or ad networks that are hijacked by embedded malware.

Disconnect also protects you from tracking by social networks like Facebook, Twitter, and Google, which use your browsing experience even when off-site in order to collect data about you. What’s more, you’ll never have to worry about sidejacking, which is where an attacker uses stolen cookies to access your personal data without having to know your password. Available in free version and Premium, the main difference is that Premium adds mobile malware blocking and tracking to its arsenal, too.


HTTPS Everywhere (Chrome/Firefox/Opera)


One of the must-have tools for your browsing experience, HTTPS Everywhere shunts your connection to SSL whenever possible, and will try to find secure versions of the sites you visit. This protects your browsing experience and online privacy without you really having to do anything. Updates have also just been rolled out to keep you safe on thousands more sites around the web, and this extension is free for download.


Tunnelbear (Chrome)


This Virtual Private Network (VPN) encrypts all of your internet traffic, secures your browser data, and offers robust protection from prying eyes. Best of all, this won’t cost you a dime. Unfortunately, though, Tunnelbear is only available on Chrome at the moment; Safari and Firefox users will have to wait a little longer for this extension to come their way.


Web of Trust (Chrome/Firefox/Safari/IE)


Web of Trust (WOT) is a free extension that ranks sites by reputation and shows you whether a specific site has been known to host malware or is loaded with tracking cookies and scripts that could wreak havoc on your system.


If you’ve been browsing the web without any protection, or feel like your online privacy is at risk, talk to one of our experts at 1-866-BIT-WISE or sales@eitnetworks.net, and we’ll be happy to help.

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10 Apr

Bid Farewell to Internet Explorer

If Google Chrome, Firefox, and Opera had a little get-together, Internet Explorer would probably be the butt of all their jokes. That’s not to say Internet Explorer never served a purpose, but it clearly has not kept up with the likes of today’s modern browsers. Microsoft knows this, which is why they’re releasing a new browser later this year. The name of it is Spartan, and there are some nifty features that may just revolutionize the way you use the web.

What is Spartan?

Spartan is Microsoft’s new web browser that will be released later this year along with Windows 10. Microsoft’s aim is to build a browser that is designed for the modern web, which creates a more personable experience when interacting with it. Here are few of the incredible changes Spartan has in store.

Web Note

Also known as inking, Web Note allows you to edit web pages directly. You can do this by either typing them or using an interactive pen that allows you to literally circle, underline, or annotate pages as you see fit. These annotations can then be shared with friends and colleagues via email or social networking. They’ll also be stored on Microsoft’s OneDrive cloud storage for easy collaboration.

Reading View

A web page can be a busy place, and the guys at Microsoft know that. That’s why they’ve created Reading View, which provides distraction-free reading to keep you focused on the content. Reading View eliminates ads, fancy CSS styling, sidebars and comments, creating a simple format that feels as if you’re looking at an open book.

Cortana, your new personalized assistant

More and more phones are enabling their devices with personal assistants, so why not web browsers? Cortana is designed to make your web browsing experience easier and more personalized. For example if you’re looking up a business or restaurant, Cortana can provide additional information such as opening hours, address and contact info.

Another nifty feature of Cortana allows you to get a definition or content explanation without leaving your current page. Just highlight the word, right click and select Ask Cortana. She’ll provide you with the info you’re looking for, right there on your web page.

Want to learn more about Spartan or other Microsoft Windows News and tips? Do you think it sounds dumb and would rather just keep using Chrome or Firefox? Regardless, if you have a question about what services EIT Networks provides, call us today at 1-866-BIT-WISE or email sales@eitnetworks.net.

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19 Dec

Pin it on Google Chrome

Google Chrome is one of the most popular browsers in use today. With steady updates, fast speeds, and the ever useful tabs, it’s difficult to imagine working without it. For users who have the same tabs constantly open, did you know that there is a useful feature in Chrome that allows you to ensure that these tabs are always available?

What is Chrome’s Pin Tab feature

When using Chrome’s tabs, you will notice that tabs open from left to right. When you browse the Internet, you likely open the most used or important sites first, which means they will open to the left. The problem with this is we often have so many tabs open that it can be tricky to find or quickly navigate to the tabbed sites we use the most.

One way to solve this problem is by pinning these to the tab bar. When you do this, the tab will be pinned to the left-hand side and made smaller. This makes it easier to find your important tabs and keep these sites and tabs more organized.

How do I pin tabs?

If you would like to pin tabs:
1.Open the site you would like to pin in a new tab.
2.Right-click on the tab.
3.Select Pin Tab.

This will shorten the tab to just the site’s icon and move it to the far left of the tab bar. Pinning other tabs will also move them to the left, beside the other pinned tabs. Any new tabs will be opened to the right of pinned tabs.

It is important to note here that because the pinned tabs are smaller any live tabs, such as Gmail’s unread message counter, or Facebook’s chat reminder, will no longer be updated. For most tabs this is not an issue, but for tabs like Gmail you will have to physically click on the tab to check if you have any new emails.

How do I unpin or move tabs?

You can unpin tabs by right-clicking on the pinned tab and selecting Unpin Tab. You can also move the order of pinned tabs by clicking and holding on the pinned tab you would like to move and moving it left or right. As you do so, you will notice other tabs change order.

If you would like to close the pinned tab, either unpin it first and then press the X at the right-hand side of the tab, or right-click on the tab and select Close Tab.

Looking to learn more about using Chrome? Contact EIT Networks today at 1-866-BIT-WISE or sales@eitnetworks.net and we can show you how to enhance your business functions.

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28 Nov

Freeware, Freeware Everywhere!

The Internet is loaded with free software, which is a good thing. Who doesn’t like free stuff? Some of this software is as good as or better than similar commercial products. For instance, GIMP is a free image editor/paint program that offers more features than some payware. It is amazing that people will produce such superb software and simply share it with society. If you are on a tight budget, you can look to freeware to keep your wallet happy. Of course, there is a dark side. With adware or spyware, you may get more than you bargained for. Here are some tips on keeping your computer or laptop safe while benefiting from the generosity of gracious software developers.

Do Your Research

Let’s say you need a free audio editor. You could simply type in “free audio editor” into your browser’s search bar, click on the first page that comes up, and download that particular audio editor. Don’t do that. Chances are it will be a perfectly fine website with secure downloads, but how do you know if it is a good product or not? What if it comes bundled with any unwanted junk? Will it turn your computer into a digital billboard for, say, NOS energy drinks? This is where research comes into play. Search for “best free audio editor” instead and look at multiple articles. If you see one particular program that consistently shows up at the top of the list, it may be the one for you. Just be sure to look at its strengths and weaknesses before downloading it.

Download the Right Product from the Right Website

Using the example of an audio editor once again, let’s assume you’ve found a good one called AudioEditorExtreme+ (fictional). Who makes this wonderful program you want? Well, you found out through the research process that it is produced by a company called AEEInc (again, fictional). The problem is that there is another freeware download called AudioEditExtreme+ made by VirusesRUs. You don’t want that one. It is a bad program. Yes, I know this is a ridiculous example, but it is here to serve the point that you should take great care in downloading the right program. The best method is to go directly to the official company website to retrieve it. If you do go to a site such as CNET.com, just be sure that the freeware you download is the right one and not one with a similar name!

Read the EULA, Whydontcha?

End User License Agreements are boring. Who reads them, anyway? Well, when installing freeware, it is a good idea to at least take a glance at it. If there is anything at all in there that makes you uncomfortable, it may be best to go back and find another program. For instance, if the EULA states that during the installation process a port will be opened that allows data to be continually streamed from your PC to the software developer’s server, you may want to pass! This is another extreme example, but you would be surprised at the data collection methods some companies utilize. There is a virtual plethora of freeware out there, so if you do not like the EULA for one, move on to another.

Be as Cautious as a Cat

Have you ever seen a cat hunt? It takes its time. It moves slowly and carefully as it nears its prey. It does not just run in willy-nilly, but creeps in close and gets the jump on a potentially faster animal. When it comes to the installation process, be like a cat. Take your time and read everything. Do not merely click “Next” or “Yes” without seeing what you are agreeing to. Even highly-rated, legitimate freeware may come bundled with garbage you do not want, including (but not limited to) browser toolbars, antivirus software, weather apps, registry scanners, or search engines. All of these can slow down your computer or laptop or just flat-out annoy you. Even worse, some can open up a “backdoor” into your system that hackers can exploit. Therefore, during the installation process, uncheck all of these extra programs. If even just one of these bundled items is mandatory, cancel the installation altogether and download a different program. Remember, this is YOUR system we are talking about, and YOU are in charge. Do not become prey on your own property!

Run an Anti-Malware Scan Afterwards

This may seem like overkill to you. After all, if you followed all the steps so far, why worry about malware? Well, you shouldn’t worry about it, per se, but remember that you are dealing with freeware, which is notorious for containing unwanted stuff. Even after following all of these steps, you never know what bad stuff may be hidden among the good stuff. An anti-malware scan is a great way to give you peace of mind about the new files on your hard drive. Besides, running frequent scans is ALWAYS a good practice, and what better time is there to run one than after accessing various websites and downloading programs? Chances are extremely high that you will never say to yourself, “Self, I wish I hadn’t run that anti-malware scan.”

There is a lot of great freeware available these days. Again, it is wonderful that certain individuals have dedicated a portion of their lives in making products to share with their fellow man. However, you should understand the risk inherent in freeware. Stick to the ideas in this article and you’ll have much better success in keeping your system clean. On a side note, if you have REALLY enjoyed a free program or service for an extended period of time, perhaps a donation is in order. If you realize they kept you from having to buy an expensive program, think about donating a little something to show them you appreciate their generosity!

EIT Networks offers IT consultation, network security, and 24/7 managed IT services. To find out more about how EIT Networks can assist your business, contact us at 1-866-BIT-WISE or sales@eitnetworks.net

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23 Sep

7 Time Saving Google Search Tips


Google Search is arguably the most popular search engine in the world. For business users it has become the first port of call when they are looking for information on nearly anything and everything, and many of us use it on a daily basis. While we may find what we need, there are numerous tips and tricks to help you find what you are looking for quicker. Here are seven:

Search inside one site only

Oftentimes, we are looking for an article, words, page, or even image from one site. If you simply search for it on Google, you may find the site right away, but you will also see results from other sites. To narrow down the results a little, try using the search operator site:.

When using site: followed by a web address in the search bar (without a space), Google shows results for that site at the top of the results list. So, if you are looking for an article that has the keywords: ‘cloud technology’ on CNN, you can enter: site:cnn.com cloud technology.

Search for results based on a page’s title

If you are looking for a specific webpage, but don’t know the site it is on, you can use the operator: intitle: followed by keywords. This tells Search to look for webpages that contain the keywords in the title.

For example, if you are looking for a webpage that has the title: five cloud tips, you can search for it by entering: intitle: five cloud tips. Note, be sure to add a space between the operator and the keywords/titles.

Do two searches at once

Using an OR operator between two keywords tells Search to show results for both of the keywords at the same time. This can be useful for when you are looking to quickly compare two different ideas or topics.

The key to making this operator work is to make sure that OR (in capital letters) is between the two terms you are looking for, and separated by a space on both sides.

Exclude certain results or keywords

With many Google searches you will often see results for local businesses with a presence on Google first, or results related to your local area. While these can be useful, when you are looking for non-local results, it can take time to sort through these findings.

If you see that there are a number of results with keywords or terms that you are not interested in, then put a – (minus) in front of the term (without a space) e.g., -term, and Search will not show results containing that word.

Quickly find sites that link to yours (or another)

One of the key components of successful SEO (Search Engine Optimization) is link building – the concept of increasing links to and from your site. With Search’s various updates, Google is constantly changing the way sites are ranked and displayed in results. Businesses with websites need to ensure that the links they are using to direct to other content, or to bring people into their site are legitimate.

One quick way to see who links to your site is to use the Search operator: link:site.com. Simply enter link:yoursite.com, and Google will display results for all other sites and content that contain links to your site.

Fill in the blank searches

Looking for something where you know the first and last part of say the name, title, sentence, etc? You can use the Search operator * to help. The * (asterix) functions as what is called a wildcard, or unknown, operator. When used, it tells Search that you don’t know the words that are missing, and that you want Search to try and fill in the results.

Use quotes to search for exact terms

The way Search works is that when a set of keywords are entered with spaces, Search will return results that contain the words either separately or together in any order. If you know exactly what you are looking for, you can add double quotes (“) around the terms.

By using double quotes, Google will show results that only contain those exact words, in that order. While this is useful, longer sentences in quotes will return fewer results, so if you aren’t finding what you are looking for, try reducing the number of words inside the quotes.

If you are looking to learn more about Google Search, contact us today at 1-866-BIT-WISE to see how we can help.

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